41 years as a meat eater and now a vegetarian, how did that happen?

mm-pictureWhat do vegetarianism and jobs have to do with each other I hear you ask!

The answer will surprise you: Becoming a vegetarian means change and so does looking for work, whether it is for the first time or as a career move.  As with any change in our normal routine, both these actions require thought, careful planning and for many of us, a fair bit of anxiety.

I believe most of us want change for the better in our lives, our work and around us.  For change to happen though, there needs to be an intent quickly followed by an action.  Hoping that someone else will make that change happen for us is sadly one of those habits we’ve all acquired over hundreds of years.  We have become good at outsourcing most of the activities and actions that we are responsible for and then when things go wrong, we still rely on others to put things right for us!

My book, ‘Let Go Or Be Dragged’ will show you how you can outsource less,  enjoy making conscious choices, and experiment with new actions which will result in the change we all long for.

So, today on MeatFreeMonday as a gift to you, and to give you a flavour of my book, I am giving you Chapter 1 below which explains how I went from being a carnivore to a vegetarian. Enjoy and have a beautiful day!

We let go of the need to eat meat and as a result a new vegetarian based diet came into being.

So what walet_go_or_be_dragged_cover_for_kindles it that made you decide to become a vegetarian? My Mum asked me. When I look back it’s hard to remember the exact tipping point, but I had become more and more uncomfortable about eating meat, particularly cows. The decision took me completely by surprise. I loved meat and had eaten only organic meat for a number of years. Was it because I’d become more exposed to people who had vegetarian and vegan lifestyles? Was it because I had become more aware of the environmental impact? Did I just think, I don’t need to eat meat anymore? Maybe it was a combination of all those factors.

I wasn’t one of those children who had always loved vegetables so this wasn’t a natural transition for me, but, along with my partner, we decided to try it out. We said to each other if either one of us wants to have meat at any time, we’ll embrace it. The funny thing is it’s been just a handful of times we’ve “felt the urge.”

Why has it worked? I think it’s because we were able to find alternatives to our meat based diet. With a partner who loves to cook and a willing apprentice in me, we took it as an experiment to try new recipes and that experiment continues as it becomes a more permanent way of life for us. We let go of the need to eat meat and as a result a new vegetarian based diet came into being.

So why tell you this story of my change in eating habits?

This book is all about taking the pro-active route to change and this is one such example of that. There was no enforced change put upon me, this was my own personal choice. So what factors were at play here and what can we learn from this? My decision arose from a deeper awareness of what is happening around me combined with giving myself the time and space to reflect on this and experiment with a new way of being.

Making a decision is obviously a key part in creating change, but equally important is taking action and following through. Most changes in diets involve some sort of sacrifice and stopping yourself from eating the selected product(s), however by reframing the shift in our eating habits to one of experimentation, we found that we didn’t feel deprived or lacking in anything, quite the reverse, we embraced the fun of trying the new and simultaneously observing our behaviour and urges.

Try it for yourself. What part of your life would you like to experiment with now?

The great thing I observed about myself as I was making this change through experimentation is that it releases you from some of the perfectionist behaviours you may carry with you. For me, I’ve always had this feeling that I have to get something “right.” I am drawn towards finding the best and the most effective way of doing something. When you start an experimentation through food because we eat every day, each day you have the opportunity to “try again”, to “do something different” and that definitely takes the pressure off and this gives way to more enjoyment.

Another benefit of experimentation through food is that you are flexing your “change muscle” on a daily basis and having that practice every day is a great way to embed a new habit which in turn gives you greater confidence in your ability to bring about further changes. At the very least, it has the ability to revitalise the routine you find yourself in, offering you an opportunity to reconsider and refresh your daily choices and become more alert to everything that’s available to you.

Personally I believe that is the key to enabling change; giving yourself the permission and the opportunity to slow down, observe and reflect upon your daily choices which in turn helps to bring a refreshed awareness to all your activities.

Next time you go into autopilot, stop and ask yourself, what choice am I making now? What am I allowing into my life and am I happy with that?

Enjoyed what you’ve read so far?  Want to read more?

Download the book here now

Thank you for reading, Happy #MeatFreeMonday

 

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Inspiring Jobs – Skip Garden Freelance Chefs

SKIP GARDEN FREELANCE CHEFS

Kings Cross, London

 Global Generation
Part time dependent upon demand and availability

£10 to £12 per hour

Closing date:

Ongoing throughout the year

Global Generation is a youth education charity that operates a moveable vegetable garden and cafe on the King’s Cross development site.  We use land-based activities and the metaphors of ecological and cosmic processes to support building community between each other and the natural world. We primarily work with local young people, businesses and families in King’s Cross as well as at our campsite in Wiltshire. We combine activities such as supporting bees, carpentry, urban food growing, cooking, and eating together with dialogue, story, creative writing, silence and stillness.  These practices help us to create the conditions for people to come together in a fuller and more connected sense of who they are and what they are a part of and from that space, to support them to practically contribute to ecological and social change.

When people think of skips they think of construction, building and dirt. We didn’t. We thought less rubble and more rhubarb. That’s why we started using skips to farm food that, like us, is locally grown. So pop over and say hi. No hard hat needed.

About the opportunity

We are looking for creative, dedicated and passionate Chefs to enter into our pool of freelance Chefs. As one of our freelance chefs you will be responsible for producing and working on events that are taking place in the garden and beyond. These can range from cooking lunch for a workshop for 20 guests over being responsible for one of our street food stations during garden events with 100+ guests to taking our cargo bike out to cater for larger events on the King’s Cross site

The Skip Garden Kitchen acts both as a commercial enterprise producing high quality food and service as well as an important learning platform for young people.

Summer is a busy time for us with many events in the garden and beyond. We are looking for bright, talented and friendly event chefs to help us execute our events to the highest standards. You could be taking the food bike out to events around King’s Cross, catering for weddings, private dining and summer parties. If you are a confident cook with prior experience of working in a busy kitchen come join us!

This is a self-employment opportunity, you must have a valid UTR or be in the process of acquiring one to apply.

Apply Here